One of the Web founders warns about censorship and surveillance

One of the Web founders warns about censorship and surveillance

Are you looking for a VPN to bypass internet censorship? Information security indeed is now becoming a major concern. Information security is the set of processes which maintain the confidentiality, integrity and availability of business data in its various forms.

Sir Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the World Wide Web and founder of the Web Foundation, has called for the Internet to be recognized as a basic human right.

After the revelations from Edward Snowden concerning some extensive government espionage, Tim Berners-Lee warned against that Internet being “censored and under surveillance” would become a threat to the democracy. “Internet and social networks encourage more people to organize themselves, to act and highlight the misdeeds around the world. This threatens some governments and increases monitoring and censorship that becomes in turn a threat to the future of democracy, “said the Briton, who launched Internet on Christmas Day 1990. “Bold measures are now essential to ensure the protection of our fundamental rights to privacy and freedom of opinion online,” he also commented on the sidelines of the launch of the “Web Index” which measures the growth, utility and impact of the Internet on individuals and nations.

Some key learnings about this study:

  • At least 1.8 billion Internet users have little or no right to privacy or freedom of expression online thanks to pervasive surveillance or censorship.
  • Legal safeguards against government snooping on our communications were eroded or bypassed in many countries in the past year, with 84% of Web Index countries failing our test for basic privacy safeguards, up from 63% in the 2013 Index.
  • Nearly 40% of countries blocked politically or socially sensitive Web content to a moderate or extreme degree in 2014, up from 32% in 2013.
  • In 74% of Web Index countries, lack of net neutrality means that ability to pay may limit the content and services users can access.
  • 20% of female Internet users live in countries where harassment and abuse of women online is extremely unlikely to be punished.

The Web Index is a composite measure which summarises the impact and value derived from the Web in various countries in an average number. Scores are given in the areas of universal access; freedom and openness; relevant content; and empowerment.

The study made by Web Index in 2014-2015 resulted in a ranking of countries that set Denmark and Finland ahead of Norway.

Despite recent criticism concerning privacy violations, after Edward Snowden’s revelations, Great Britain and the United States came respectively fourth and sixth in the rankings, due to some criteria such as ” relevant content availability” or “political impact”. France ranks 11th and surprisingly enough, Canada comes only at the 15th position. Among emerging nations, Argentina ranks first before Costa Rica, Brazil, and Tunisia.

China, Russia, Saudi Arabia and Pakistan are among the worst offenders for censoring politically-sensitive web content and having inadequate safeguards against government surveillance, the report said. Ethiopia ranks last at the 85th position.

Cyber security is a key concern for many people nowadays.

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